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Course Descriptions

English Department Courses

ESL I

The English I course is designed to allow students who are non-native speakers of English to develop skills in all aspects of the English language: speaking, reading, writing and listening. No time frame can be allotted, as students will improve at their own paces. Students are expected to speak English most of the time, even if their skills are minimal, as these are total immersion classes. The objective is to improve English skills to assist them in everyday life in the United States. The emphasis will be on vocabulary development and the structure of the language. Using the "Flipped Classroom Methodology", students make use of technology in the classroom and during homework assignments.

ESL II

The English II course is designed to assist students who are non-native speakers of English to increase their skills in all aspects of the English language: speaking, reading, writing and listening. Students are expected to speak English all of the time while in class. The objective is to further improve English skills. The emphasis will be on the oral communication, grammar, mechanics, and writing skills. Using the "Flipped Classroom Methodology", students make use of technology in the classroom and during homework assignments.

ESL III

The English III course is designed to guide students who are non-native speakers of English to proficient use of the English language in all facets of syntax and semantics. The objective is to increase English skills, preparing students for the rigor of university classes. Using the "Flipped Classroom Methodology", students make use of technology in the classroom and during homework assignments.

English Literature and Composition

The English Literature course is a yearlong course for which English III is a prerequisite. Coursework focuses on reading (including oral reading), composition, research writing, vocabulary, grammar, and literature. Outside reading and literature text selections are chosen by the instructor based on the skill levels of the individual students and the overall ability of the group. Computer use will be implemented for basic homework, research, and multi-media presentations.

Literary Genres and Composition

Literary Genres and Composition will start with a review of all the grammar concepts. Thorough explanation, practice, and application of basic grammar usage will include all parts of speech, parts of the simple sentence, agreement of subject and verb, verb usage, pronoun usage, punctuation, capitalization, and adjective and adverb phrases. Practical application in all composition and essay work is encouraged. Students will study basic literary elements with an emphasis on short stories, poetry, and novels. Students will learn to write in a variety of forms—journals, essays, and creative writing. Both writing and vocabulary skills will be necessary tin order to move on to the tenth grade curriculum. Students will be expected to make continuous use of the computer for homework, note taking, research, and multimedia presentations.

World Literature and Composition

World Literature and Composition will expand and refine knowledge gained with more attention given to other literary forms than those studied in Literary Genres. Students will examine literature from all over the world and from a variety of time periods. Students will review grammar concepts as well as literary terms studied in the ninth grade. Grammar review will reemphasize all material covered in the ninth grade year with added emphasis placed on the subordinate clause and verbal phrase forms and their incorporation into essays and compositions. Students will begin to make greater use of previously acquired skills in their writing. They will write too inform, persuade, analyze, and create. Students will be expected to make continuous use of the computer for homework, note taking, research, and multimedia presentations.

American Literature and Composition

American Literature and Composition is an upper-level course that will continue to reinforce earlier concepts in both grammar and literature, with increased emphasis on a more demanding college preparatory structure. Grammar studies will now center on composition, utilizing the skills begun in the ninth and tenth grade years, emphasizing greater expertise in identifying the basic structural elements of the English sentence and analyzing their usage. Students will learn to write in a more analytical style, using the work of American authors as the basis for their study. Students will also address the development of an argument, using clear organization, smooth transition, and appropriate references. In preparation for their college or university experience, students will be expected to make continuous use of the computer for homework, note taking, research, and multimedia presentations.

American Literature and Composition (Honors Level)

Honors-level American Literature and Composition encompasses all major concepts and requirements outlined in the regular American Literature course, but with an increased emphasis on exposing students to a selected number of additional supplemental works by American authors requiring a higher level of comprehension and critical thinking. A higher degree of ability in written composition will be required from an honors-level student.

British Literature and Composition

British Literature and Composition is an upper-level course utilizing the literature of Great Britain to build on the concepts from American literature. The literature is also used to detail higher-level ideas of leadership, relationships, human rights, philosophy, etc. over a period of centuries. In addition to gaining an understanding of British influence on our nation, students study literature in order to analyze literary techniques and styles of European authors. A much greater emphasis is placed on critical writing and analysis in the fourth year, and most grammar instruction occurs within that context. Increased use of compound and complex sentences, elimination of fragments and run-ons, and more care with regard to punctuation and structure of ideas are predominant. In preparation for their college or university experience, students will be expected to make continuous use of the computer for homework, note taking, research, and multimedia presentations.

British Literature and Composition (Honors Level)

Honors-level British Literature and Composition encompasses all major concepts and requirements outlined in the regular British Literature course, but with an increased emphasis on exposing students to a selected number of additional supplemental works by English authors requiring a higher level of comprehension and critical thinking. A higher degree of ability in written composition will be required from an honors level student.

Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition

A.P. English Literature will cover all concepts in the traditional senior level British Literature and Composition course, but with a stronger emphasis on more demanding literary works from both English and world literature. A.P. English students will, of course, be expected to go above and beyond the status quo. They will develop higher thinking, reading, and writing skills through the use of teacher selected supplemental material as well as vigorous outside reading. The course is designed to help prepare students for the Advanced Placement Exam during the spring semester. Any student enrolled in the A.P. English course will be required to take the Advanced Placement test in the spring. In preparation for their college or university experience, students will be expected to make continuous use of the computer for homework, note taking, research, and multimedia presentations.

Research Writing

Research Writing is a one-semester elective course designed for all students wishing to improve their writing skills through the completion of a major paper similar to that which the student will see on the college level. Students will be required to plan, research, write, and revise a 12-to-15-page paper on a topic from 20th /21st century American history, using standard Modern Language Association (MLA) format. The various sections of the paper will be assigned according to specific due dates throughout the eighteen weeks of the semester. Students will be expected to make daily use of the computer for most research, preparation, and typing of the research project.

Expository Writing

Expository Writing is a one-semester course designed for students who wish to improve their skills in the area of essay writing, particularly those essays that will be required on the college level. Along with required journal writing and preparation of individual portfolios, students will be required to complete a series of the various essay forms throughout the semester, including informative, compare and contrast, literary analysis, commentary, persuasive, cause and effect, and current event. Expository writing is predominantly a paperless class, so students will be expected to make daily use of the computer for producing all compositions, completing any required research, and preparing portfolios.

Creative Writing

Creative Writing is a one-semester course open to all students wishing to further develop their composition skills through numerous forms of creative written expression. Along with required journal writing and preparation of an individual portfolio, students will be asked to write original works in both fiction and non-fiction. The course will cover non-fiction biography and autobiography, as well as both formal and informal essays. Students will write in most major poetic forms and will compose a number of short stories and a small one-act play. Creative writing is predominantly a paperless class, so students will be expected to make daily use of the computer for producing all compositions, creating poetry pages, and preparing portfolios.

Short Stories

Short Stories is an upper-level semester course open to all students wishing to advance their understanding of literature through a concentrated and scholarly exploration of contemporary short fiction. The course focuses on developing the student's ability to perform competent literary analysis through the recognition and understanding of appropriate literary ideas. Using this knowledge, students should be able to write competently on the major themes of each selection, specifically focusing on characters, setting, varying points of view, and elements of human behavior. An integral part of this course will be the ability not only to comprehend the text selections, but also to speak on them intelligently in a classroom setting. Students will be expected to make continuous use of the computer for homework, note taking, and multimedia presentations.

Mythology

Mythology is a one-semester, upper-level elective course designed to provide students with an integrated study of the historical context of world mythology. The course focuses on developing the student's ability to perform competent literary analysis through recognizing and understanding appropriate literary terminology associated with the study of myth. Using these ideas, students should be able to write competently on the major themes of each piece of literature, specifically with regard to the comparing and contrasting of the belief systems of major civilizations. An integral part of this course will be the ability not only to comprehend the text selections, but also to speak on them intelligently in a classroom setting. Students will be expected to make continuous use of the computer for homework, note taking, and multimedia presentations.

Public Speaking

Public Speaking is a one-semester elective course designed to help students become more comfortable with oral communication in a public group setting. The course focuses on developing the student's ability to research, organize, and deliver oral presentations on a variety of topics. Students will study the significance of public speaking in our society through the examination of important speeches and their historical context. They will learn to recognize the various forms of both verbal and nonverbal communication, and they will develop a better understanding of the importance of good listening skills. In addition, students will also be introduced to the various elements of forensics and will participate in a competitive debate. Students will make use of computers for basic research and preparation of oral presentations.

Journalism

Journalism is a one-semester elective course designed to provide students with an introduction to the field of journalism and mass communication, teaching students to be consumers of media and to understand newsgathering and production. The course includes basic news writing, reporting, editing, and legal and ethical issues. In addition, class members will write, edit, design, and layout the school newspaper using desktop publishing. Leadership, cooperation, and high standards of achievement are essential to all students participating in this course.

History of the Language

History of the Language is an upper-level, one-semester course designed to introduce advanced students to the rich history of the English language from its earliest roots in the ancient language of Indo-European to its present 21st century form. Students will begin with a close examination of basic phonetic pronunciation, using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) in order to approximate the sounds of English in its various evolutionary stages. Intense study of the various historical eras of the language will follow, and the course will conclude with a look at 21st century variations in speech, regional dialects, and slang. Students will make daily use of computers for note taking, studying the sounds the language, and working with phonetic pronunciation and transcription.


Modern Language Courses

French I

French I is a yearlong, introductory course to the sounds and basic grammar of the French language. The student will acquire a working vocabulary that is applicable for basic day-to-day use (i.e. greetings, personal descriptions, ordering food, and describing the weather). Simple verb tenses will be covered and the student will attain a level of comfort with the present, passé composé, and the future. He/she will become acquainted with basic conversation and oral exercises and is expected to increase their aural skills through listening activities. Discussions include French grammar, linguistics, and culture.

French II

French II continues to build upon the basic skills that the student acquired during French I. Basic grammar, understanding of syntax, and verb conjugation in the present are expected. The course will impart further study of French verb tenses and more specialized vocabulary to allow the student to develop more fluency and confidence in day-to-day conversation. The student will be expected to begin processing written and spoken communication in a manner that promotes "thinking in French." This course will facilitate learning through several components including: aural, oral, and literary prose.

French III

French III will solidify the student's knowledge of French grammar ending the year with a thorough examination of the subjunctive and review of all previous tenses and grammatical constructions. The class is geared toward total conversational immersion with little to no English spoken except for absolutely, necessary explanations. The instructor will facilitate questions and conversation to test the student's ability to think in French. The student should no longer be translating from English to French and vice-versa. This class is conversation based and students will participate in weekly, conversational debates concerning either a cultural topic introduced by the textbook or a current event topic introduced by the instructor. To prepare the student for the advanced French and AP sequence this class will also begin the effort of reading small samples of original French literature.

Spanish I

Spanish I students study the portion of the language that can be used in everyday conversation. The course is taught using a communicative approach in which listening, speaking and culture are emphasized while reading and writing skills are developed. Students communicate on such topics as greetings, telling time, foods, school subjects, family and friends, likes and dislikes and leisure activities. This class is conducted in Spanish as much as possible and an emphasis is placed on becoming a competent communicator. Students expand their understanding of culture by studying about the countries of the Hispanic world. Vocabulary will focus on school, shopping, family, clothes, weather, simple foods found in restaurants and markets, holidays, and tourist activities.

Spanish II

Students will build on the basics learned in Spanish 1. They continue to increase their abilities to communicate and understand spoken and written Spanish by reading, writing, and speaking in the target language. Students continue to learn about Hispanic countries through written materials, short stories and videos, group projects, computer activities, music, and games. Success in the course depends greatly on the student's willingness to participate and use of the language in class.

Spanish III

The class is mostly conducted in Spanish. Students continue to enhance and develop the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition to using the text, students use technology, watch videos in the target language, give oral presentations, read short stories, and write in Spanish to increase their knowledge and fluency in the language. Cultural topics focus on the customs and traditions of the people of the Spanish-speaking world.

Spanish IV

The class is conducted in Spanish. Students continue to enhance and develop the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition to using the text, students use technology, watch short stories in the target language, give oral presentations, read short stories, and write original stories in efforts to increase their knowledge and fluency in Spanish. Cultural topics focus on the customs and traditions of the people of the Spanish-speaking world.

AP Spanish

This class is conducted in Spanish and is focused on improving reading, writing, listening and speaking abilities. Students will work in all four language areas to improve proficiency in Spanish with the end goal of earning a 3, 4 or 5 on the AP Spanish Language Exam. The course seeks to develop integrated language skills that are useful in themselves and that can be applied to various activities and disciplines rather than a mastery of any specific subject matter. Training in integrating language skills and in synthesizing written and aural materials is an integral part of the AP Spanish Language course.


Fine Arts Department Courses

Drawing and Painting

Students will further their ability and understanding of 2-D art. This class is an introduction to the principles of design through a variety of drawing and painting projects. These projects teach concepts such as composition, line quality, color theory and shading/value. Students will develop design skills through experimentation with media such as graphite, colored pencil, pen and ink and pastel. Painting media will include acrylic and watercolor techniques. Various styles and artists throughout history will be explored.

Mixed Media Sculpture

Students will further their understanding of art using a combination of 2 and 3-D art techniques. The purpose of this class is to gain understanding of how materials relate through design principles such as line, composition, spatial qualities and form. Students develop design sense with a variety of techniques, including low relief sculpture, model making, paper arts and collage. Media may include paper, paint, cardboard, wire, plaster and paper arts. Selected artists, styles and art movements will be included in discussion/study.

Print Making

This class is an introduction to methods of creating multiple images from one original. Special attention will be focused on the mechanics of building a plate or "stamp" for each method of making a print. Design concepts such as positive and negative space, line quality, shape and surface texture will be explored. Project techniques will include relief printmaking styles such as string prints, linoleum carving, collographs, embossing and monoprints. Various artists, styles and art movements throughout history will be discussed.

Middle School Theatre

This course teaches the skills and techniques that lie in the foundation of great theatre. We will focus on the collaborative nature of the creative process with individual units on interpretation, directing, designing, and acting. We will trace the journey that different theatre artists travel. Each project the students create will involve extensive creativity.

Drama

Drama is a one-semester, performance-based course designed to develop the skills of acting for the theatre. Students will learn healthy vocal production; improvisation, motivation, and exploration to establish character; to evaluate self, each other, and outside mediums; the history and current trends in acting; and audition techniques. Students will develop an understanding of the basic skills necessary for an actor to give an expressive realistic performance on the stage. Students will use word to write a personal monologue, using Microsoft Word, based on their favorite hobby, and present this to the class as a final project. Through readings, rehearsal assignments, and performance, students will develop an analytical, physical, and psychological approach to the development of character by exploring and applying methods learned in class. Students will also work hands-on in this course exploring all areas of technical theatre: set design and construction; costume design and construction; make-up; lighting; sound; publicity; and house management.

Dance

In this course students will receive training in many different forms of dance, including ballet twice a week, modern twice a week, and jazz once every other week. Students will also learn the basics of choreography and create their own class dance piece with their classmates. A brief cultural history of dance will be covered in the class to further develop a comprehensive understanding of the origins of dance and how it developed over the years. Students will be able to understand and execute the basics of different dance styles by the end of the course. The class will have a final ballet and modern dance piece where students will present an accumulation of the semester's work in class.

Acting Methods and Techniques

This is a one-semester, performance-based course designed to develop the skills of acting for the theatre. Students will learn healthy vocal production; improvisation, motivation, and exploration to establish character; to evaluate self, each other, and outside mediums; the history and current trends in acting; and audition techniques. Students will develop an understanding of the basic skills necessary for an actor to give an expressive realistic performance on the stage. Through readings, rehearsal assignments, and performance, you will develop an analytical, physical, and psychological approach to the development of character by exploring and applying methods learned in class.

Cardio Movement

In this course students will learn the basics of many styles of movement. They will receive a vigorous work out through dance, yoga, Pilates, aerobics, Tai chi, and many other forms of movement and exercise. By the end of the semester, students should have a basic understanding of different types of movement exercises and how to execute them successfully. During the course of the semester, students will learn a brief history of each style of movement we are doing

Technical Theatre

In this hands-on course, students will explore all areas of technical theatre: set design and construction; costume design and construction; make-up; lighting; sound; publicity; and house management. Students will design, build, and tech all Panther Players productions. In this course students will develop an understanding of the components and design of Panther Players productions as well the importance of quality and craftsmanship. The class is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the skills needed to work in the filed of technical theatre and by the end of the course they will be able to build, install, and run a Panther Players production. Everything we do in the classroom will contribute directly to the current school production. We will work on professionalism and polish of each production's technical aspect. Students will build a scenic model based on a play that we have studied in class and then write a short artist's statement that details the creative elements they used in their design.

Musical Theatre

This class will contain information about the various aspects of the musical theater. Through introduction and review of vocabulary used in the musical theater, and demonstration, this course will provide students with the skills and knowledge they need to produce a musical. Students will become familiar with the three basic components of the musical theater: singing, dancing, and acting. By the end of the semester students should be able to define the major roles of those involved in creating a musical, name several major musicals, sing and dance as a part of a chorus or individually, a well as perform a role as a character.

Dance

In this course students receive training in many different forms of dance including ballet, modern, and jazz. They will also learn the basics of choreography and create their own class dance piece with fellow classmates. A brief cultural history of dance will be covered in the class to further develop a comprehensive understanding of the origins of dance and how it developed over the years. They will research a famous ballet or modern dancer to write a brief essay about that particular dancer’s life. Students should be able to understand and execute the basics of different dance styles by the end of the course. The class will have a final ballet and modern dance piece where they will present an accumulation of the semester’s work in class.

Vocal Music

Vocal Music is designed to provide students with the opportunity to make music singing alone and in a group. Fundamentals of music will be taught through the music that is sung. Opportunities to perform in assemblies and at the GISA literary meet will be available.

Instrumental Music

Instrumental Music is designed to provide students with the opportunity to make music both by playing instruments alone and in groups. Fundamentals of music will be taught through the music that is played. Guitar and keyboard will be offered. Opportunities to perform in assemblies will be available.

Middle School Music

Emphasis will be placed on learning the basic elements of music and music notation. Musical concepts will be developed through hands-on activities such as sight singing and identifying and/or creating rhythms on classroom instruments. Students also will be introduced to significant musical works and composers from a variety of cultures and stylistic genres.


History Department Courses at Brandon Hall

World History

World History surveys historical patterns to understand and evaluate our rapidly changing world. This course focuses on two principal areas: the growth and development of modern civilization and the framework for international contacts among different societies. In addition, the course is designed to strengthen critical thinking skills by interpreting socio-political patterns between societies and the people who shaped world history. Each student will be required to produce a 600-word, annotated research paper. World history is the foundational course for all other social studies courses and is required for graduation.

United States History

The course in United States history provides an examination and analysis of the American narrative viewed from the perspective of four fundamental themes including, (1) the multicultural heritage of the United States, (2) the democratic spirit of the American political tradition, (3) the changing face of America's economic resources, and (4) the impact of escalating global independence. Students will develop competency in evaluating historical information from primary and secondary sources and in the interpretation of data derived from graphs, maps, and charts. In addition, students will evaluate the cause and effect relationships of major historical events and explain their impact on modern American society. The U.S. history course is required for graduation.

Advanced Placement United States History

Advanced Placement United States history utilizes a more accelerated pace of study including additional outside reading assignments, more essay composition, additional biographical profiles and critical thinking skills. Each student will produce a 600-word annotated research paper and pass a comprehensive AP exam. Students must be pre-approved by the history department for acceptance into AP class.

United States Government (one semester)

Government surveys the main principles and structure of the United States government at the national, state, and local levels. Students gain greater insight into the inner workings of the civic process and gain an enhanced appreciation for the rights and responsibilities of good citizenship. The course is available to students who have completed World History and United States History. The course in U.S. Government is required for graduation.

Advanced Placement United States Government (one semester)

This course explores the political theory and everyday practice that direct the daily operation of our government and shape our public policies. The express purpose of this course is to prepare students to take the AP Exam for U.S Government and Politics. The course is for all intents and purposes taught on a college level and it requires a substantial amount of reading and preparation for every class. The objectives of this course go beyond a basic analysis of how our government works. Each student must pass a comprehensive AP exam. Students will develop a critical understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the American political system, as well as their rights and responsibilities as citizens.

Economics (one semester)

Economics is designed to provide students with the basic knowledge of the American modified free-market economy. Students analyze micro and macroeconomics, including topics about the Federal Reserve System, the stock market, and trade. Each student will produce a PowerPoint presentation on a pre-selected topic. The course is available to upper classmen who have completed world history and United States history. The course in economics is required for graduation.

Advanced Placement Macro-Economics (one semester)

The purpose of Advanced Placement course in Economics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Particular emphasis is placed on the study of the national income and price determination, as well as economic performance measures, economic growth, and international economics. Each student will produce a PowerPoint presentation on a predetermined topic and pass a comprehensive AP exam. This college-level course promotes the understanding of aggregate economic activity, the utilization of resources within and across countries, and the critical evaluation of determinants of economic progress and economic decisions made by policymakers.

20th Century World History (one semester)

This elective course offers an overview of significant historical events and episodes from the 20th century, including the expansion of western imperialism in the early 1900s to the threat of extremist terrorism that closed out the century. Due to advanced level of discourse, it is a recommended that students possess strong reading skills and have already taken and passed a course in world history with a grade of B or better.

African Studies (one semester)

This elective course examines the continent of Africa in the wider context of world history, illustrating how Africans have influenced regions beyond their own borders. Regional and thematic chapters cover the cultural, economic and political currents of African history. Each student will produce a 600-word annotated research paper. Due to advanced level of discourse, it is a recommended that students possess strong reading skills and have already taken and passed a course in world history with a grade of B or better.

Asian Studies (one semester)

This course integrates the political, social, intellectual, and economic histories of Monsoon Asia, India, China, Southeast Asia, Korea, and Japan from early times to the present. Chapters include cross-cultural comparisons, chronologies, and discussion topics. Due to advanced level of discourse, it is a recommended that students possess strong reading skills and have already taken and passed a course in world history with a grade of B or better.

Comparative Religions (one semester or one year)

This elective course provides an overview of the development, doctrines and practices of today's major faiths, including coverage of current issues such as fundamentalism and religion in politics. Each student will produce a 600-word annotated research paper. Due to advanced level of discourse, it is a recommended that students possess strong reading skills and have already taken and passed a course in world history with a grade of B or better.

Introduction to Psychology (one semester)

This course provides an introductory overview of six major domains of psychological study, including Self-Awareness, the Body, the Mind, the Environment, Mental Health and Lifespan as a framework for thinking about human behavior. Students will examine a balance of classic and contemporary research as well as a comprehensive integration of the psychology of men and women. Each student will produce a 600-word annotated research paper. Due to advanced level of discourse, it is a recommended that students possess strong reading skills and have already taken and passed a course in world history with a grade of B or better.

Introduction to Sociology (one semester)

This elective course offers an examination of basic elements in the study of sociology. In addition, students will explore how the media impacts society, analyze controversial social issues and gain insight into other cultures in the U.S. and around the world as well as the growing influence of technology on life and society. Due to advanced level of discourse, it is recommended that students possess strong reading skills and have already taken and passed a course in world history with a grade of B or better.

World Events (one semester)

This elective course offers an examination of current events in the United States and the world. In addition, students will explore various forms of media and media bias. Students will use the Internet, as well as newspapers and magazines to analyze world events. Due to the advanced level of discourse, it is recommended that students possess strong reading skills and have already taken and passed a course in world history with a grade of B or better.


Math Department Courses

Algebra I

Algebra I begins with a review of basic concrete skills, using the four fundamental math operations, variables, simple equations, and the number system. Later concepts include topics such as real numbers, polynomials, fractions, systems of linear equations and functions, equalities and inequalities, rational and irrational numbers and expressions, and quadratic functions. Problem-solving techniques, with emphasis on accurate calculation skills, are incorporated throughout the year as related concepts are taught. Students are expected to master basic algebraic skills and their practical applications in preparation for subsequent required course work such as Geometry and Algebra II. A variety of classroom technologies and software will be used to review concepts, make presentations and teach students to collaborate and communicate using the iPad, Apple TV and web-based student portal system. Students also learn how to use PDF editing software and are expected to keep a digital resource of notes and work.

Geometry

This course introduces students to basic figures (plane and solid), including angle relationships, perpendicular lines, planes, parallel lines, congruent triangles, circles, parallelograms, areas, and volumes of solids. Students use both inductive and deductive reasoning skills to write indirect and formal proofs. Geometry includes constructions and coordinate geometry. Algebraic skills are reviewed and strengthened through application to solving problems in geometry. The use of a scientific calculator is included to enhance the study of trigonometric functions. Students will be expected to use Microsoft Word and mathematic software GeoGebra to summarize concepts and make presentations.

Algebra II

Students beginning Algebra II must have successfully completed Algebra I and Geometry. Principal course skills include simplifying algebraic expressions, solving linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, factoring polynomials, applications of factoring, operations with rational expressions, complex and irrational numbers, theories of polynomial expressions, derivation of conic sections, graphing equations and inequalities, functions, series and sequences, exponents and logarithms. Included in the course work and derived from previous skills are many applications using basic and advanced world-problem attack strategies. The use of a TI-Nspire calculator and its functions are incorporated into class. A variety of classroom technologies and software will be used to review concepts, make presentations and teach students to collaborate and communicate using the iPad, Apple TV and web-based student portal system. Students also learn how to use PDF editing software and are expected to keep a digital resource of notes and work.

Honors Algebra II

This is an in-depth study of the topics of functions, including their graphs and applications. The course includes the study of linear, quadratic, polynomial, radical, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. Students are taught to model real world data with functions, and to use functions to make predictions. Conic sections, complex numbers, and sequences and series will also be taught. A graphics calculator is required.

Statistics with Applied Algebra

The course is a study of basic mathematical, algebraic, and geometric concepts and applications. Topics covered include fractions, decimals, and percent; ratio and proportion; basic linear and quadratic equation solving and graphing; consumer mathematics; metric and customary measurement; basic geometry: and probability and statistics. This course provides the opportunity to strengthen basic math skills and practice applying those skills in a real world environment.

College Algebra

College Algebra is an advanced-level algebra course that reviews and expands the skills learned in Algebra II. The course is an extension of Algebra II with a more in-depth study of algebraic topics. The course enriches and extends the students' mathematical knowledge through problem solving and application of learned concepts. The course provides a sound mathematical foundation and prepares students for college-level mathematics courses. Included in the course are the properties of real and imaginary numbers, the simplification of complicated algebraic expressions using exponents and radicals, applications of equations and inequalities, functions and their graphs, solving polynomial equations, graphing conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations and inequalities, and probability. The use of a TI-Nspire calculator and its functions are incorporated into class. Students will use various aspects of computer technology including, but not limited to, spreadsheets for compiling data, which can be graphed using equation editors and PowerPoint presentations illustrating methodology presented in class.

Pre-Calculus

Pre-Calculus is a course for the mathematically adept student. The course includes conic sections, angles, degree and radian measure, application and graphs of trigonometric functions and identities, addition and subtraction identities, double and half-angle identities, solving trigonometric equations, solving right angles, solving triangles using the Law of the Sines and the Law of the Cosines, complex numbers, polar coordinates and polar graphing vectors, infinite series, and Demoivre's Theorem. The use of a TI-Nspire calculator and its functions are incorporated into class.

Pre-Calculus (Honors level)

The formal study of elementary functions is extended in this course. Students apply technology, modeling, and problem-solving skills to the study of trigonometric and circular functions, identities and inverses, and their applications, including the study of polar coordinates and complex numbers. Vectors in two and three dimensions are studied and applied. Problem simulations are explored in multiple representations - algebraic, graphic, and numeric. Quadratic relations are represented in polar, rectangular, and parametric forms. The concept of limit is applied to rational functions and to discrete functions such as infinite sequences and series. The formal definition of limit is applied to proofs of the continuity of functions and provides a bridge to calculus

Calculus

This course is designed for those students who have shown significant mastery of algebraic and trigonometric skills. Students are exposed to studies in many rigorous topics, including limits, continuity, differentiation, definition of integral, fundamental theorem of calculus, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions, techniques of integration, and various applications. The use of a TI-Nspire calculator and its functions are incorporated into class. Geogebra will be used to represent functions graphically, and Microsoft Excel, Word Processor, and PowerPoint will be used to make presentations.

AP Calculus AB

Calculus AB is primarily concerned with developing the students' understanding of the concepts of calculus and providing experience with its methods and applications. The courses emphasize a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically and verbally. The connections among these representations also are important. The course is intended to be challenging and demanding. Broad concepts and widely applicable methods are emphasized. The focus of the courses is neither manipulation nor memorization of an extensive taxonomy of functions, curves, theorems or problem types. Thus, although facility with manipulation and computational competence are important outcomes, they are not the core of these course. The use of a TI-Nspire calculator and its functions are incorporated into class.

Descriptive Statistics (One Semester)

Descriptive Statistics is a one-semester course designed for students who have shown significant mastery of algebraic skills and want to explore data and its uses and abuses in society today. Course content includes random sampling, organizing data, averages and variation, regression and correlation, probability theory, and the binomial probability distribution.

Inferential Statistics (One Semester)

Inferential Statistics is a one-semester course designed for the students who have shown significant mastery of algebraic skills and descriptive statistics. Course content includes normal distributions, sampling distributions, Central Limit Theorem, estimation, hypothesis testing and inferences about differences.

Introduction to Linear Algebra (Honors)

The course introduces students to linear algebra, with applications. The course contents include: solving linear equations using matrices and Gaussian elimination, matrix algebra, determinant, linear independence, basis, vector space, subspace, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, inner product, orthogonality and projections. In addition, applications related to linear algebra will be taught. The students will be using a graphing calculator and computer program (Mathematica) that has matrix capabilities. They will have a project that will need to be completed in a word processing platform, and a presentation intended for a Pre-Calculus class in PowerPoint. The honors-level version of this class will make use of the computer program Mathematica that will allow students to apply concepts in "real life" problems.


Science Department Courses at Brandon Hall

Physical Science

Physical Science is a two-semester laboratory course that is designed to provide students with an understanding of how their physical world works through the presentation of core topics from chemistry and physics. This course helps students make important connections between the science they learn in class and the science they experience in everyday life. Within each field, students are taught practical skills that illustrate what a professional scientist might use in their respective fields. Yearlong themes include how scientists use previous knowledge to develop new theories, how science is still changing today, how humans are affecting the environment, and using the scientific method to solve problems everyday. The use of technology is woven throughout the class. Students have short projects and labs that require the use of Word, Excel, and PowerPoint or Keynote to make presentations. Other assignments have them making their own audio and visual recoding using QuickTime Player. Internet resources including their online textbook, Quizlet.com, and a class Wikispaces page, are used on a daily basis.

Biology

Biology is a two-semester laboratory course that is designed to help students determine what distinguishes a living thing from a non-living thing starting at the most elementary level. As the students progress through the various biological levels of organization, a desire is cultivated for continued acquisition of scientific knowledge with an emphasis on the profound appreciation for the study of life. Students will learn to use the scientific method, which involves asking scientific questions, developing hypotheses, collecting data, and drawing conclusions. Technology will be implemented through the use of PowerPoint presentations for lecture material, use of Word and Excel for lab reports, and the use of the Internet for research.

Advanced Placement Biology

AP Biology is a two-semester lab course that is designed to give students experience in dealing with the workload of a college science class. The class will go into more detail and involve a deeper understanding of Biology, building on concepts previously learned in Biology and Chemistry. Because of this, college preparatory or honors Biology and Chemistry are required prior to enrollment in AP Biology. In conjunction with the AP Biology class, an AP Biology lab class is required. Preparation for the AP Biology exam will occur throughout the year and concepts covered follow all College Board standards. Students will be required to use PowerPoint, Excel, Word and other programs in order to complete class work and lab work.

Advanced Placement Biology Lab

AP Biology Lab is a two-semester course that is to be taken in conjunction with the AP Biology class. Students will learn the process of inquiry and will be required to write detailed lab reports for each lab performed. The labs conducted in the AP Biology lab course include but are not limited to all labs suggested by the College Board for the completion of AP Biology. Though most labs will require and enhance the hands-on laboratory experience of a college science course, some of the more equipment intensive labs will be executed virtually. Lab write-ups will require knowledge of Word and Excel.

Chemistry

Chemistry is two-semester laboratory course that includes a survey of the fundamental principles of chemistry. First-semester topics include atomic structure, periodic table, chemical nomenclature, and chemical bonding. Second-semester topics begin with scientific calculations and data analysis, continuing with the mole and stoichiometry, states of matter, solutions, equilibrium, and acids and bases. Student will be exposed to a variety of technological components such as Microsoft applications (PowerPoint, Word, Excel), virtual lab demonstrations, and Internet websites.

Advanced Placement Chemistry

Advanced Placement Chemistry is a two-semester laboratory course that is designed to keep with the objectives of the College Board; students enrolled in AP Chemistry will cover content equivalent to what is presented in two semesters of college general chemistry. Upon successful completion of this course and achievement of a satisfactory score on the AP Chemistry Examination, students may have the opportunity to receive general chemistry credits or place out of general chemistry classes and move into more advanced science courses during their first years in college. During the first semester, students will review concepts presented during their first course of high school chemistry beginning with problem solving skills, data collection, significant figures, stoichiometry, and the basics of the periodic table and general properties of matter. Moving from this review foundation, students will study chemical reactions, solutions, properties of gases and thermochemistry before focusing on a more in depth examination of the periodic table and chemical bonding. Students will explore the intricate differences between solids and liquids as they begin the second semester. Properties of solutions and reactions of acids and bases follow thereafter. In addition, students will also study chemical kinetics, equilibrium, spontaneity, free energy, entropy, and electrochemistry. Technology is also a very big component in this course. PowerPoint presentations, virtual lab demonstrations, and Microsoft applications (Word and Excel) are used daily.

Advanced Placement Chemistry Lab

The Advance Placement Chemistry Lab course runs in conjunction with the Lecture class for two semesters. The chemistry laboratory is the place where students learn about the behavior of matter by firsthand observations, calculations, and experimentation. The ultimate goal of this course is to introduce and learn the skills necessary to make laboratory investigations. Students will be introduced to synthesis of compounds, separations techniques of matter, titrations, spectrophotometry and calorimetry, and data analysis techniques. Virtual lab demonstrations and Microsoft applications such as Word and Excel, as well as Internet websites, are used for each lab assignment.

Physics

Physics is a two-semester laboratory course with a primary objective of familiarizing students with the basic physical concepts and principles of mechanics, waves, sound, light, and electricity. A conceptual as well as a mathematical approach is utilized. Problem-solving skills are emphasized, and a strong mathematical background is required. Lab experiments familiarize students with various methods of taking, recording, and analyzing data including using spreadsheets such as Excel and Numbers. Students make daily use of a variety of programs, including the Microsoft Office Suite and the iWork Suite.

Advanced Placement Physics

AP Physics is a two-semester course that engages the student in rigorous mathematical computations. Preparation for the AP test takes place throughout the year. Pre-Calculus should be completed as a prerequisite, or, at the minimum, be taken concurrently with AP Physics. Topics taught are determined by the College Board, which include, but are not limited to, forces, projectiles, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, and optics. Students are also required to take AP Physics Laboratory along with AP Physics. During the fall semester, students will be required to complete an intensive long-term project. Computer technology is used on a daily basis for note taking, virtual demonstrations, and presentations.

Advancement Placement Physics Laboratory

AP Physics Laboratory is a two-semester course that is taken at the same time as AP Physics. Each student is taught not only how to conduct numerous laboratory exercises with a wide variety of equipment, but more importantly are taught how to interpret and present the data that they acquire. The graphing of the data is emphasized. The use of technology is evident throughout. Students write a lab report with spreadsheets and graphs for each exercise. In the fall semester, students are required to complete a long-term project, which must contain a technology component.

Integrated Science

Integrated Science is a two-semester class designed to tie in various fundamental scientific principles that overlap in five different core science subjects. These include scientific laws and theories found in chemistry, physics, biology, astronomy, and earth science. Within each field, students are taught practical skills that illustrate what a professional scientist might use in their respective fields. Yearlong themes include how scientists use previous knowledge to develop new theories, how science is still changing today, how humans are affecting the environment, and using the scientific method to solve problems everyday. Students are taught the use of Word, Excel, and PowerPoint/Keynote to make reports, graphs, and presentations. Internet resources including their online textbook, Quizlet.com, and a class Wikispaces page are used on a daily basis.

Renewable Energies I/II

Renewable Energies I and II are one-semester elective courses designed to raise awareness about the benefits of renewable energy, efficiency, and energy savings. These courses will introduce concepts concerning to renewable energy sources, renewable energy technologies, and applications of renewable energies and its environmental impacts. Topics include: Energy and climate change, solar thermal energy, solar photovoltaic, wind energy, bioenergy, hydroelectricity, geothermal energy, and hydrogen fuel cells. Students taking these classes will be required to use a variety of computer technologies for both grasping concepts and presenting assignments.

Astronomy I/II

Astronomy I and II are one-semester elective courses during which students will first be introduced to the history of astronomy, its pioneers, and its tools. Then, they will move onto our neighborhood—the Solar System. The formation, life, and death of a star are the focus of the next unit. The final unit will deal with the origins of galaxies and the expansion of our universe. Study skills such as reading, highlighting, outlining, preparing and flash cards will be sharpened. PowerPoint presentations, Apple TV, and other forms of technology are used on a daily basis. In the fall semester, students are required to complete a long-term project, which must contain a technology component.

Ecology

Ecology is a one-semester laboratory course that is designed to help students understand the complex interactions between organisms and their environment. As the students progress through the class, they will obtain knowledge on the more complex interactions between organisms and the diversity of life in different ecosystems. Students will continue to use the scientific method, which involves asking scientific questions, developing hypotheses, collecting data, and drawing conclusions. Students will also be expected to complete lab reports using Word and Excel, as well as follow lectures on PowerPoint.

Environmental Science

Environmental Science is a one-semester course that is designed to introduce students to the world of environmental studies by helping them acquire basic analytical tools to investigate major environmental problems in their own surroundings, as well as around the world. Students are exposed to current environmental problems and policy issues from local, national, and global viewpoints. Students will study global ecosystems, natural resources and human interactions with both. Environmental science will explore real-world issues and the scientific method will be used to propose solutions to these problems. Students will also be expected to complete lab reports using Word and Excel, as well as follow lectures on PowerPoint. Two projects will be completed in the course involving solutions to global environmental problems.

Engineering the Future 

Engineering the Future I and II are semester-long courses designed to introduce students to technology and engineering. The courses challenge students to understand why they need to study the STEM subjects if they do not plan on going into science or math as their career. Through this course’s practical real-world connections, students have an opportunity to see how science, mathematics, and engineering are part of their every day world, and why it is important for every person to be technologically and scientifically literate. Each course is project-based, with two projects, each being a marking period long. For each project, the class is given a task, such a designing a computer case/organizer, building a model skyscraper, or improving a specific boat design. This helps model the real world where you may be given a task to complete, but you have space in the job assignment to show innovation and creativity. Students must complete Engineering the Future I before moving on to Engineering the Future II. Technology will be used throughout the course, from design and implementation, data collection, and video and audio presentations.


Middle School Courses at Brandon Hall

6th Grade Literature and Composition

This course focuses on developing the student's ability to perform competent literary analysis through the recognition and understanding of appropriate literary terms and devices from a variety of genres including short story, drama, biography, poetry, and the novel. In addition, the English 6 course focuses on developing a solid working knowledge of the mechanics of standard writing through exercises and designed to promote the use of proper grammar, syntax, and punctuation. Moreover, the course encourages in the student a sense of continuity and cohesiveness in his/her writing skills by introducing the student to a variety of composition activities including journal writing, personal narratives, expository writing, and essays. The writing process includes pre-writing, drafting, proofreading and revising. Vocabulary for each selection in the text and outside reading is incorporated into a variety of usages and application forms. All of these reading, writing, vocabulary, syntax, and grammar elements are accomplished through hands-on activities and interactive lessons. Technology is also used daily in the classroom to not only aid students in learning techniques, but to also allow them to gain experience with digital mediums.

7th Grade Literature and Composition

English 7 is designed to provide an integrated study of the English language from the perspective of the four primary domains of the language arts program which includes the reflective task of reading and listening as well as the development of the expressive skills of speaking and writing, discussion, problem solving and critical thinking experiences. The course focuses on developing the student's ability to perform competent literary analysis through the recognition and understanding of appropriate literary terms and devices from a variety of genres including the short story, drama, biography, poetry, historical fiction, and the novel. Additionally, outside reading is assigned with several novels being completed during the year based on each student's ability and interest. In addition, the English 7 course focuses on developing a solid working knowledge of the mechanics of standard writing through exercises designed to promote the use proper grammar, syntax, and punctuation. Moreover, the course encourages in the student a sense of continuity and cohesiveness in his/her writing by introducing the student to a variety of composition activities including expository writing, journal writing, personal narratives, and essays. The writing process includes pre-writing, drafting, proofreading, and revising. Additionally, topics in writing research papers are introduced. All of these literary and composition elements are accomplished through hands-on activities and interactive lessons. Technology is also used daily in the classroom to not only aid students in learning techniques, but to also allow them to gain experience with digital mediums.

8th Grade Literature and Composition

English 8 is designed to provide an integrated study of the English language from the perspective of the major areas of the language arts program. These areas include reading, listening, speaking, writing, discussing, problem solving and critical thinking experiences. The course focuses on developing the student's ability to perform competent literary analysis through recognizing and understanding appropriate literary terms and devices from a variety of genres including the short story, drama, biography, poetry, historical fiction, and the novel. In addition, the English 8 course focuses on developing a solid working knowledge of the mechanics of standard writing through exercises designed to promote the use of proper grammar, syntax, and punctuation. Vocabulary for each selection in the text is incorporated into a variety of usage and application forms. The course encourages in the student a sense of continuity and cohesiveness in his/her writing by introducing the student to a variety of composition activities including expository writing, journal writing, personal narratives, and essays. The writing process includes pre-writing, drafting, proofreading, and revising. Additionally, topics in writing research papers are introduced. All of these literary and composition elements are accomplished through hands-on activities and interactive lessons. Technology is also used daily in the classroom to not only aid students in learning techniques, but to also allow them to gain experience with digital mediums.

6th Grade Mathematics

Mathematics 6 instruction focuses on mathematics as way of thinking and as a tool for solving everyday problems. Students will develop problem-solving skills as well as math communication and language skills. The course of study includes statistics, operations involving whole numbers, decimals, fractions, mixed numbers, integers, introduction to algebra, measurement, ratio, proportion, percent, graphing on the coordinate plane, perimeter, circumference, area, polygons, and probability. Manipulatives, calculators, and computers are integral parts of the course and provide various opportunities for diverse levels of application and assimilation of concepts. Computer skills include use of an eBook, note-taking on the iPad, writing assignments on the iPad, iPad calculator use, using Numbers to construct various types of graphs on the iPad, and numerous iPad apps are added throughout the year.

7th Grade Mathematics

Mathematics 7 instruction focuses on mathematics as way of thinking and as a tool for solving everyday problems. Students will develop problem-solving skills as well as math communication and language skills. The course of study includes operations, properties, problem solving, decimals and measurement data analysis and statistics, basic geometry, number theory and fractions, fraction operations, introduction to algebra, ratio and proportion, percents and applications of percent, integers, graphing integers on the coordinate plane, probability, area and volume. Manipulatives, calculators, and computers are integral parts of the course and provide various opportunities for diverse levels of application and assimilation of concepts. Computer skills include use of an eBook, note-taking on the iPad, writing assignments on the iPad, iPad calculator use, using Numbers to construct various types of graphs on the iPad, and numerous iPad apps are added throughout the year.

8th Grade Mathematics

Mathematics 8 instruction focuses on mathematics as a way of thinking and as a tool for solving everyday problems. Students will develop problem-solving skills as well as math communications and language skills. The course of study includes operations, properties, problem solving, data analysis and statistics, area and volume, algebraic equations, integers and integer equations, graphing integers and integer equations on the coordinate plane, number theory, rational numbers, ratio and proportion, percent and application of percent, counting principles, probability, geometry, square roots and special triangles, and motion geometry. Manipulatives, calculators, and computers are integral parts of the course and provide various opportunities for diverse levels of application and assimilation of concepts. Computer skills include use of an eBook, note-taking on the iPad, writing assignments on the iPad, iPad calculator use, using Numbers to construct various types of graphs on the iPad, and numerous iPad apps are added throughout the year.

Pre-Algebra

The pre-algebra course is designed to enhance the student's understanding of computational, calculator, and computer skills through the use of basic algebraic concepts. The course focuses on independent practice to move the students beyond arithmetic operations and into mathematical concepts which demand greater recognition of integrated strategies, including generalizations, abstract reasoning, and pattern formulation. Students are required to verbalize the language of algebra and discuss algebraic topics while performing operations; understand key words used in word problems; associate and relate proportions, ratios, percents, fractions, and decimals; and apply computer and calculator skills to graphing and exponential exercises. Additionally, students must understand the relationship between algebraic skills and fundamental components of geometry; use a combination of concepts during testing; determine how formulas, diagrams, and graphs are used for problem solving; define mathematical terms; and use logical though processes to solve word problems. Students complete the course with an appreciation of how algebraic skills are applied in daily use. Manipulatives, calculators, and computers are integral parts of the course and provide various opportunities for diverse levels of application and assimilation of concepts. Computer skills include use of an eBook, note-taking on the iPad, writing assignments on the iPad, iPad calculator use, using Numbers to construct various types of graphs on the iPad, and numerous iPad apps are added throughout the year.

Algebra I (Requires permission of Department Chair)

Algebra I begins with a review of basic concrete skills, using the four fundamental math operations, variables, simple equations, and the number system. Later concepts include topics such as real numbers, polynomials, fractions, systems of linear equations and functions, equalities and inequalities, rational and irrational numbers and expressions, and quadratic functions. Problem-solving techniques, with emphasis on accurate calculation skills, are incorporated throughout the year as related concepts are taught. Students are expected to master basic algebraic skills and their practical applications in preparation for subsequent required course work such as Geometry and Algebra II. A variety of classroom technologies and software will be used to review concepts, make presentations and teach students to collaborate and communicate using the iPad, Apple TV and web-based student portal system. Students also learn how to use PDF editing software and are expected to keep a digital resource of notes and work.

6th Grade General Science

The curriculum integrates the practice and study of the environment and the natural world with other topics. The concepts are introduced in a General Science context. Students utilize hands-on resources from Project Wet, Project Wild, Project Learning Tree, Monarch's of Georgia, and Our Shared Forests. We participate in Citizen Science activities including National Bird Counts, National Wildlife Federation Activities, and Adopt a Stream. We have adopted the Horseshoe Bend section of the Chattahoochee River and Powers Ford Creek in the Big Tree Forest preserve. By doing so we monitor temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen and micro invertebrates. Additional content information is accessed by Internet research and utilization of educational materials and partnerships from both private and public sources including: N.A.S.A., Stone Mountain Park education center, the Clean Air Campaign, National Wildlife Federation, the Carter Center, Jr. Master Gardeners, Atlanta Aquarium Society, Georgia Mineral Society, Environmental Education Alliance of Georgia, Tellus Science Museum, National Park Service Fulton County Department of Public Works Water Services Division, National Weather Service, Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area, Western Aquatic Plant Management Society, Master Gardeners, Georgia Mineral Society, Educational Director Chattahoochee Nature Center, Atlanta Botanical Garden, Zoo Atlanta, North Fulton Amateur Radio Association, Georgia Native Plant Society, Gwinnett Environmental and Heritage Center, Tree Tops Gwinnett, Fernbank Science Center, National Park Service, Johns Creek Environmental Campus, The University of the South, and local ichthyologists. In addition to the campus, which is a certified Wildlife Habitat, in the classroom proper, students interact with variety of animals including: Cichlids in an African Rift Lake Habitat Hybrid Red Parrot Cichlids, Amazon Basin Habitat, Yellow-eared Slider Turtle, Amazon Miniature frogs, Bets Fish, Blue Tongue Skink, Death Head Cockroaches, Guinea pig, Ant farm and rabbit. The classroom also houses an Amateur Radio Station with both FM and 10 Meter Band Radios. Students have the opportunity to speak with people throughout the world and learn about habitats and issues in those areas of the world. Students participate in competitions at Zoo Atlanta. Students practice regular nature journaling during each semester and use science magazines from Scholastic to keep abreast of current events in the field. The content areas provide a foundation through which the students explore science topics using the scientific method.

7th Grade Life Science

The curriculum integrates the practice and study of the environment and the natural world with other topics using concepts in a Life Science context. Students utilize hands-on resources from Project Wet, Project Wild, Project Learning Tree, Monarch's of Georgia, and Our Shared Forests. We participate in Citizen Science activities including National Bird Counts, National Wildlife Federation Activities, and Adopt a Stream. We have adopted the Horseshoe Bend section of the Chattahoochee River and Powers Ford Creek in the Big Tree Forest preserve. By doing so we monitor temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen and micro invertebrates. Additional content information is accessed by Internet research and utilization of educational materials and partnerships from both private and public sources including: N.A.S.A., Stone Mountain Park education center, the Clean Air Campaign, National Wildlife Federation, the Carter Center, Jr. Master Gardeners, Atlanta Aquarium Society, Georgia Mineral Society, Environmental Education Alliance of Georgia, Tellus Science Museum, National Park Service Fulton County Department of Public Works Water Services Division, National Weather Service, Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area, Western Aquatic Plant Management Society, Master Gardeners, Georgia Mineral Society, Educational Director Chattahoochee Nature Center, Atlanta Botanical Garden, Zoo Atlanta, North Fulton Amateur Radio Association, Georgia Native Plant Society, Gwinnett Environmental and Heritage Center, Tree Tops Gwinnett, Fernbank Science Center, National Park Service, Johns Creek Environmental Campus, The University of the South, and local ichthyologists. In addition to the campus, which is a certified Wildlife Habitat, in the classroom proper students interact with variety of animals including: Cichlids in an African Rift Lake Habitat Hybrid Red Parrot Cichlids, Amazon Basin Habitat, Yellow eared Slider Turtle, Amazon Miniature frogs, Bets Fish, Blue Tongue Skink, Death Head Cockroaches, Guinea pig, Ant farm and rabbit. The classroom also houses an Amateur Radio Station with both FM and 10 Meter Band Radios. Students have the opportunity to speak with people throughout the world and learn about habitats and issues in those areas of the world. Students participate in competitions at Zoo Atlanta. Students practice regular nature journaling during each semester and use science magazines from Scholastic to keep abreast of current events in the field.

8th Grade Earth Science

The curriculum integrates the practice and study of the environment and the natural world around us with other topics in an Earth Science context. Students utilize hands-on resources from Project Wet, Project Wild, Project Learning Tree, Monarch's of Georgia, and Our Shared Forests. We participate in Citizen Science activities including National Bird Counts, National Wildlife Federation Activities, and Adopt a Stream. We have adopted the Horseshoe Bend section of the Chattahoochee River and Powers Ford Creek in the Big Tree Forest preserve. By doing so we monitor temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen and micro invertebrates. Additional content information is accessed by Internet research and utilization of educational materials and partnerships from both private and public sources including: N.A.S.A., Stone Mountain Park education center, the Clean Air Campaign, National Wildlife Federation, the Carter Center, Jr. Master Gardeners, Atlanta Aquarium Society, Georgia Mineral Society, Environmental Education Alliance of Georgia, Tellus Science Museum, National Park Service Fulton County Department of Public Works Water Services Division, National Weather Service, Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area, Western Aquatic Plant Management Society, Master Gardeners, Georgia Mineral Society, Educational Director Chattahoochee Nature Center, Atlanta Botanical Garden, Zoo Atlanta, North Fulton Amateur Radio Association, Georgia Native Plant Society, Gwinnett Environmental and Heritage Center, Tree Tops Gwinnett, Fernbank Science Center, National Park Service, Johns Creek Environmental Campus, The University of the South, and local ichthyologists. In addition to the campus, which is a certified Wildlife Habitat, in the classroom proper students interact with variety of animals including: Cichlids in an African Rift Lake Habitat Hybrid Red Parrot Cichlids, Amazon Basin Habitat, Yellow eared Slider Turtle, Amazon Miniature frogs, Bets Fish, Blue Tongue Skink, Death Head Cockroaches, Guinea pig, Ant farm and rabbit. The classroom also houses an Amateur Radio Station with both FM and 10 Meter Band Radios. Students have the opportunity to speak with people throughout the world and learn about habitats and issues in those areas of the world. Students participate in competitions at Zoo Atlanta. Students practice regular nature journaling during each semester and use science magazines from Scholastic to keep abreast of current events in the field.

6th Grade World History

This course focuses on the origins and development of global civilization throughout the evolution of human history. Students examine the events of world history from the perspective of five fundamental themes including, (1) elements of commonality and diversity, (2) conflict and cooperation, (3) continuity and change, (4) individualism and interdependence, and (5) human interaction with different environments. Emphasis is placed on the students' understanding of concepts related to historical research including identification of primary and secondary sources, chronology, historical empathy, point of view, and analysis of cause and effect relationships. In addition, students learn to recognize the significant impact of geography, culture, economics, and government on the growth and development of a particular world region and the various ethnic groups that inhabit it. Additionally, students examine topics in United States History during the second semester. 5th and 6th Grade students use iPad technology for word processing, Keynote presentations, and pamphlet creation as a means to connect with history.

7th Grade Geography

This course is designed to develop student competence in world geography according to eighteen specific national goals and standards covering the basic content, skills, and concepts of the discipline as outlined under the Goals 2000: Educate America Act and published under the title Geography for Life (1994). The standards include the expectation of students to learn the use of maps, globes, charts and graphs to acquire and process geographic information. In addition, students are expected to develop a spatial view of the world including cultural and physical characteristics of places and regions including climate, mountain-building forces, erosion, flooding, human migration, urbanization, transportation, and international trade. Moreover, the course emphasizes settlement patterns, resources, economic development, global interdependence, and other topical issues such as human/environment interaction, multiculturalism, and politics. In addition, students use iPad technology for word processing, Keynote presentations, and map study as a means to connect with geography.

8th Grade United States History

The history of the United States for 8th grade students provides an examination and analysis of the American narrative viewed from the perspective of five fundamental themes including, (1) the multicultural heritage of the United States, (2) the democratic spirit of the American political tradition, (3) the changing face of America's economic resources, (4) the physical environment of the United States, and (5) the impact of escalating global independence. Students will develop competency in evaluating historical information from primary and secondary sources and in the interpretation of data derived from graphs, maps and charts. In addition, students will evaluate the cause and effect relationships of major historical events and explain their impact on modern American society. Each student will complete a major research paper in the second semester as a means to practice proper MLA electronic sources as well as to model academic integrity. In addition, students use iPad technology for word processing, Keynote presentations, and pamphlet creation as a means to connect with history.